Where to Camp in Queenstown

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camping in Queenstown.

With bungy jumps, ski fields, skydives, jet boats, white water rafting and much much more, Queenstown is likely to be the town where you spend the most money in New Zealand. Camping in Queenstown is a way to cut down the costs on accommodation so you can save more money for the fun stuff, but where can you camp in Queenstown?Queenstown has very strict laws on camping, with absolutely no freedom camping options for non-self-contained camping (maybe check out 10 Best Hostels in Queenstown)and those with self-contained vehicles will have to drive quite far out of the town to find a free spot. Low-cost alternatives are just outside of Queenstown in the Department of Conservation campsites for all vehicles and tents. More convenient camping options lie in the Queenstown holiday parks but be sure to book well in advance for these limited and well-sought campgrounds.Even just parking a motorhome in Queenstown can be a little risky for fines, so park in Boundary Street Car Park if looking for daytime parking for a motorhome. On that note, here is more about camping in Queenstown…

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Holiday Parks and Campsites in Queenstown

There are three different types of campsites in Queenstown: holiday parks, Department of Conservation (DoC) campsites, and free campsites/freedom camping. Here are the main differences:

HOLIDAY PARKS

Holiday parks in Queenstown have a range of facilities of a high standard. Unsurprisingly, this comes at a higher price. They also offer a number of accommodation types, but campers can always rely on holiday parks to have powered sites to plug up your campervan and tent sites (providing there is availability). For more on what to expect from a holiday park, check outAccommodation Guide to Holiday Parks in New Zealand

DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION CAMPSITES

Maintained by the Department of Conservation (DoC), DoC campsites are low-cost campsites withlimited facilities. Twelve Mile Delta only has tap water, while Moke Lake as flush toilets, a cooking shelter and tap water. These campsites are first come first served and you pay your fee to the camp warden.

Freedom Camping in Queenstown

Freedom camping is extremely limited in Queenstown. You cannot camp for free anywhere without a non-self-contained vehicle. Certified self-contained vehicles can park for a maximum of two nights outside on public land outside of the restricted zones outlined on Queenstown Lakes District Council website. For DoC land (Lake Wakatipu bays outside of the town) allow self-contained vehicles for 4 nights maximum in a single calendar month, between 5pm and 9am the following day.

 studio tdes on Flickr© studio tdes on Flickr

Holiday Parks in Queenstown

Queenstown City
Queenstown Suburbs
  • Frankton Motor Camp, Frankton – NZ$21-$23 per person for a tent/powered site
  • Queenstown Top 10 Holiday Park, Arthur’s Point – NZ$50-$52 for two people in a tent/powered site
Arrowtown
 jbreiti on Flickr© jbreiti on Flickr

Department of Conservation Campsites in Queenstown

Lake Wakatipu

  • Twelve Mile Delta – NZ$13 per person (suitable for all vehicles and tents)
  • Moke Lake Campsite – NZ$13 per person (4WD access in winter, otherwise suitable for all vehicles and tents)
Steve & Jem Copley on Wikipedia© Steve & Jem Copley on Wikipedia

Freedom camping in Queenstown

Gibbston Valley
  • Kawarau Bridge car park, Gibbston Valley
  • East of the Gibbston Back Road and State Highway 6 intersection in the Queenstown Lakes District Council boundary.
Lake Wakatipu
  • Meiklejohns Bay
  • Twenty Five Mile Stream

For more information, check out5 Free Camping Spots in Queenstown.

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